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Full text of "The Letters Of Horace Walpole Vol I"

time, spoke vastly well, and mentioned how great Sir Robert's character is abroad. Sir Francis Dashwood replied that he had found quite the reverse from Mr. Coke, and that foreigners always spoke with contempt of the Chevalier de Walpole. This was going too far, and he was called to order, but got off well enough, by saying, that he knew it was contrary to rule to name any member, but that he only mentioned it as spoken by an impertinent Frenchman.
But of all speeches, none ever was so full of wit as Mr. Pulteney's last. He said, ' I have heard this committee represented as a most dreadful spectre ; it has been likened to all terrible things; it has been likened to the King; to the Inquisition; it will be a committee of safety; it is a committee of danger; I don't know what it is to be! One gentleman, I think, called it a cloud! (this was the Attorney) a cloud! I remember Hamlet takes Lord Polonius by the hand and shows him a cloud, and then asks him if he does not think it is like a whale.' Well, in short, at eleven at night we divided, and threw out this famous committee by 253 to 250, the greatest number that ever was in the House, and the greatest number that ever lost a question.
It was a most shocking sight to see the sick and dead brought in on both sides! Men on crutches, and Sir William Gordon14 from his bed, with a blister on his head, and flannel hanging out from under his wig. I could scarce pity him for his ingratitude. The day before the Westminster petition, Sir Charles Wager15 gave his son a ship, and the next day the father came down and voted against him. The son has since been cast away; but they concealed it from the father, that he might not absent himself. However, as we have our good-natured men too on our side,
14  Sir William Gordon, Baronet;      (1666-1743);  First Lord of the Ad-M.P. for Cromarty and Nairn;   d.      miralty, 178&-42 ; Treasurer of the June 9,1742.                                       Navy, 1741-43.
15  Admiral  Sir  Charles  Wager